How does the Symfony profiler get its data?

How does the Symfony profiler get its data?

The profiler gets its information using some services called “data collectors”. Symfony comes with several collectors that get information about the request, the logger, the routing, the cache, etc. Run this command to get the list of collectors actually enabled in your app:

What are Symfony collectors and how to use them?

Symfony comes with several collectors that get information about the request, the logger, the routing, the cache, etc. Run this command to get the list of collectors actually enabled in your app:

What’s the most awesome thing in Symfony?

The profiler – also called the “web debug toolbar” is probably the most awesome thing in Symfony. This installs a few packages and… one recipe! Run: Ok cool!

How to enable/disable Symfony profiler programmatically using matchers?

Symfony Profiler cannot be enabled/disabled conditionally using matchers, because that feature was removed in Symfony 4.0. However, you can use the enable () and disable () methods of the Profiler class in your controllers to manage the profiler programmatically:

What is a Symfony application?

A typical Symfony application begins with three environments: dev (for local development), prod (for production servers) and test (for automated tests). When running the application, Symfony loads the configuration files in this order (the last files can override the values set in the previous ones):

Can I create my own data collector in Symfony?

You can also create your own data collector to store any data generated by your app and display it in the debug toolbar and the profiler web interface. If you want to measure the time some tasks take in your application, there’s no need to create a custom data collector. Instead, use the built-in utilities to profile Symfony applications.

What are Symfony’s configuration environments?

That’s the idea of Symfony’s configuration environments. A typical Symfony application begins with three environments: dev (for local development), prod (for production servers) and test (for automated tests ).